Maui Waena, Maui High in top 5 state enrollments

The Maui News

Maui Waena Intermediate is the fourth-largest middle/intermediate school in Hawaii with 1,155 students, and neighboring Maui High is the fifth-largest high school, breaching the 2,000 enrollment mark for the first time since moving to Kahului in the early 1970s.

The state Department of Education released enrollment figures for public schools statewide for the 2018-19 school year Thursday.

Kihei Charter School was the fourth-largest charter school in Hawaii with 652 students.

On the other side of the spectrum, Maunaloa Elementary on Molokai with 38 students was the second-smallest public school in Hawaii, behind Niihau High and Elementary with nine students.

Maui High’s regular and special education student enrollment grew 3 percent from 1,950 students in the fall last school year to 2,107 students currently.

The other high schools ahead of Maui High were Oahu schools — Campbell (3,095), Waipahu (2,682), Mililani (2,616) and Farrington (2,315).

Maui Waena, a feeder school to Maui High, actually had its enrollment fall from 1,176 last year.

The second-largest school in Maui County was Baldwin High in Wailuku with 1,322 students, followed by King Kekaulike High in Pukalani with 1,097 students. Lahainaluna High had 992 students.

The largest elementary school by enrollment was Kahului Elementary, a Maui Waena feeder school, with 989 students, the fifth-largest school in the county. Other larger elementary schools were Lihikai Elementary with 855 students, Puu Kukui Elementary in Wailuku with 764 students and Princess Nahienaena Elementary with 744 students.

There were 179,698 public school students statewide, a 443 increase in students from last year. Charter school enrollments grew 386 students to 11,546 while regular school enrollments grew 57 students to 168,152 students.

Enrollment totals for all schools statewide can be found on the website www.hawaiipublicschools.org/ConnectWithUs/MediaRoom/PressReleases/Pages/SY2018-19-Enrollment.aspx.

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