A post-lunacy evangelicalism?

Not really, but The Guardian has a piece about a “new generation” of evangelicals who were not thrilled at opening our embassy in Jerusalem. They are dubious that Jesus really is coming soon.

(See https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/may/19/evangelicals-israel-usa-end-times)

That does not mean they are not stuffed full of ridiculous ideas, but the reason I point to this story is this sentence:

“To outsiders, these pieces of doomsday pop culture seem like far-fetched lunacy. For millions of Christians, they are a roadmap to the end of the world.”

I cannot imagine, under any circumstances, an American newspaper printing such a sentence. Our papers assume — against all the evidence — that religious people are decent and respectable.

(See https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/made-by-history/wp/2018/05/15/mitt-romney-may-not-like-it-but-robert-jeffress-was-a-natural-choice-to-deliver-the-invocation-at-the-new-u-s-embassy-in-jerusalem/?utm_term=.475ff452222c)

The American preachers chosen by that religious exemplar WBD — Jeffress and Hagee — would be denounced for the virulent racist, murderous, slimy creeps they are if they were not “reverend.”

If you have not experienced evangelicalism up close you cannot imagine how depraved it is. I like to listen to “To Every Man an Answer,” a call-in radio show for what purports to be the fastest-growing cult in the country, Calvary Chapel.

You cannot listen long before hearing a caller say she — more often a she — cannot wait for Armageddon, or, as they pronounce it, Omageddon. It is not easy for my readers, all of whom are more or less sane, to imagine anyone’s lusting after a thousand years of violence and misery for all of humanity, but such people exist.

Then there was this:

The Bible Code definitively proves Obama will bring Armageddon, it said

COMMENTS