Lives being put at risk

As if they were domestic arsenals, homes are filled with all sorts of items that, if used improperly by children, can kill.

Bug spray. Prescription medicines. Household cleaners. Power tools. Those little packets of dishwashing detergent. Lawnmowers. Kitchen knives. Don’t think we’re making light of the obvious; there’s a reason why we use child-proof containers, put cleaning supplies out of reach of the littlest and don’t let children cut the grass if they aren’t strong enough to safely use the mower.

Guns undoubtedly fall into that category.

So much of this nation’s eternal debate over smart gun regulations is based on adults’ legal access to guns. Call it the Second Amendment guarantee. But, a not-so-hidden chapter of this debate involves children who die in gun-related accidents that stem from improper storage in the home.

Children are inherently curious. Despite parental warnings, they’ll touch hot stoves. And time after time, in state after state, American children have died from preventable shootings – and lawmakers cowering to the National Rifle Association and other lobbyists have overwhelmingly refused to put teeth into gun-ownership laws that would make improper storage a crime.

Even in the NRA’s fictitious perfect world – in which America loosens gun-control regulations – the improper and unsafe storage of guns is inexcusable in terms of children.

In reality, we do not equate firearms with lawnmowers or dishwashing detergent, though danger through unsupervised use is obvious. But we do see (a recent New York Times) report as a clarion call for lawmakers across the United States to do what’s right and seek stiff penalties for those whose unstored weapons lead to a child’s death.

(This is a guest editorial from the The Anniston (Ala.) Star.)

* Editorials reflect the opinion of the publisher.